Naked Medicine

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Category: Legal Side of Medicine

Pharma Companies that Can’t Handle Comments Should Get Off Facebook, Good Riddance!

Jonathan at Dose of Digital talks about pharma’s fear of Facebook pages centering around 2 issues that pharma thinks require 24/7 monitoring: Adverse Events and negative publicity.

I hear the same excuse on why pharma companies are so scared to look at patient comments on blogs: adverse events.

I’m sorry, but adverse events are happening whether pharma companies are monitoring or not, and this is different from monitoring whether someone’s posting something “bad” about your company (newsflash: not everyone’s going to like you, better to expect it and have rules to address it than bury your head in the sand).


Adverse events are crucial for patient adherence and avoiding Facebook comments for fear of posts on AE is a missed opportunity for pharma to engage with patients in an issue that they all care about.

Patients expect drugs to work — rarely will patients want to get on a pharma page to thank the company for making a product that works. You may have a cancer patient who will do this if the company has gone above and beyond the call of duty to help the patient gain access to the drug that the patient otherwise cannot afford. But for the most part, patients have a “love-hate” relationship with pharma companies that is more “hate” than “love”, and I can’t blame patients for feeling this way.

What patients gripe about, and fear, and dread, are the adverse events.

Adverse events chip away a patient’s hope of getting better.

Adverse events erode a patient’s quality of life.

Adverse events make patients wonder, “would I rather stay ill, or deal with this horrible side effect?”

Then they look at companies avoiding discussion about something that is so key to their treatment experience, they naturally assume “profits before patients”. Never mind the realities of bureaucracy in adverse event reporting, I know it’s a bitch… the FDA knows it too.

That’s how pharma companies come across in their being so scared about Facebook.

Funny… I rarely recall pharma companies coming across scared when some of their sales and marketing teams find creative ways to fly under the radar to promote off-label. Somehow these companies are fine with breaking the law to “expand” usage of their drugs, but now they’re claiming they can’t deal with lack of guidance where Facebook pages are concerned.

Better companies pull their pages off Facebook if they are hard-headed about not allowing comments. Leave those who are more enlightened to get those patients’ eyeballs and possibly gain some goodwill.

Companies who want to control the message and behave hypocritically are doing the right thing by leaving Facebook: they aren’t adding value on the social network anyway.

Stop Pretending You Don’t Know, Pharma Companies!

I remembered years ago I was speaking to a Forest employee who told me how proud she was to be working at Forest because of how ethical the company and the CEO was.

That same employee was critical of me for talking to the WSJ about some of the less ethical practices that pharma companies have been using medical science liaisons – especially when all other quotes were positive – mine was the only one dealing with the abuse and misuse of the role. She felt that I should have used the media opportunity to “talk up” the profession.

I said that “talking up” the profession was what I’d done for all those years that I was running the MSL Institute. It’s time to “talk honestly” about what ails the profession so change can actually proceed.

I find what has happened with Forest Labs part of a lot of denial that some companies’ employees and executives experience when they see one thing but are told what they should be seeing.

If they oust the CEO, it will send a message to other CEOs at other pharma companies: “you’d better start hiring people underneath you who are capable of producing profit within the law, or you’ll pay for your bad hiring decisions.”

While it would be more poetically just to oust those who directly violated – firing the CEO is also part of the solution. The CEO’s job is to ensure that the people s/he has hired know how to create that ethical culture, not just talk a good talk but walking a different way when the feds aren’t watching.

After a while investors, who are always interested in protecting their investments, will catch on with the reality that golden parachutes are no longer a good deal.

Or is this too vicious of a cycle to ever catch up with the investors and the Street’s pocketbooks?

Would You Cancel a Surgery if Your Surgeon is Getting a Kick-Back?

The specific question is about getting kickbacks as a surgeon using a medical device, and was originally asked on Quora. The explanation to the question (posted by the asker) said,

“The department of justice has investigated conflicts of interest, and the Pittsburgh Post Gazette has published on the topic. To quote from the gazette:

Payments to other Pittsburgh area physicians include:
• The Orthopaedic Group of Pittsburgh received $75,000 to $100,000 this year from Smith & Nephew, and two of its doctors, Ari Pressman and Allan Tissenbaum, received individual fees. Smith & Nephew reported paying the same range of fees to Carnegie Mellon University, and to Carnegie Mellon professor Dr. Jeffrey O. Hollinger, a bone tissue regeneration expert.

• Biomet has a relationship with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, through Dr. Freddie H. Fu and Dr. Christopher Harner, paying $75,000 to $100,000.

• DePuy’s largest payment went to Dr. Lawrence Crossett, a UPMC surgeon who has received $250,000 to $275,000. On Dec. 6, he’s scheduled to perform two knee replacement surgeries, which will be broadcast over the Internet by DePuy and viewed by doctors.

• Zimmer, the largest of the joint manufacturers, paid out the most to Pittsburgh doctors, $1.16 million through Oct. 31.”

Regrettably, this is a relatively small fraction of the total physicians, giving the impression that most physicians have these conflicts of interest. Fortunately, the department of justice’s investigation has helped curtail these conflicts of interest. Having said that, if you discovered the night before your procedure that your surgeon has such a conflict, would you proceed with your surgical procedure or would you cancel it? Assume that the procedure is elective, not emergent.

I think there are various caveats to the question being asked, and perhaps, a different way of asking the question that can help the patient make better decisions about whether to stay with the surgeon or find another doctor:

Questions that came to my mind were:

  • Does the surgeon opt to cut when there is no clear benefit to surgery or when another therapy would give as good of a result?
  • Does the surgeon opt for one device over another device and is this decision based on a kickback or is it based on clinical data that suggests a benefit for the patient’s profile?
  • Is the surgeon an inventor or co-inventor of the device?*

Conflict of interest comes to light when surgeon has mostly a financial incentive to choose one device or another or to recommend surgery over nonsurgical alternative if there is no clear clinical benefit or if the recommendation introduces new side effects to the patient.

The last point that I marked with * warrants discussion because this is not so “clear cut” a conflict of interest as the first 2 bullets. In devices the physician may be an inventor or coinventor and then licenses the technology or device to a company.

Even though the physician may have a conflict of interest – by receiving royalty payments for example – the physician is also the best expert on the technology that s/he has invented, so the choice to go for one’s own device may have less to do with a kickback and more to do with the physician’s belief in the invention’s efficacy/benefit.

Here’s a link to an article a while back (and how I got the “mostly royalties” impression) from WSJ when device companies had to post what they’d paid to orthos – although the asker rightly pointed that that the medical device company engineers are probably the majority of inventors to the technology rather than the MDs themselves.

Yet there’s also the argument made by Andy Lemke on Quora (in the comments section) that a doctor who serves as consultants to several companies must know his/her stuff since s/he is so sought after by device companies, so it’s not necessarily going to hurt that physician’s integrity in the eyes of the patient.

FDA Has to Slow Down to Keep Up with Drug Companies

Steve Woodruff is hopping mad with the apparent gross inefficiency and indecision of the “guidance process” for pharma company promotional practices when it comes to social media, and I can’t blame him!

But I’m on the FDA’s side this time.

Let me say up front that I never liked how the FDA remains vague and slow in the past, it sucked when I was a pharma employee trying to figure out just what the FDA “wants”, but the FDA had long acted like a tripped out lover who has something in mind but we’re supposed to guess or better yet – read his mind.

But today I am much more forgiving of the FDA than I am of pharma company management.

I was looking at a recent run down of 2010′s lawsuits settled by drug companies and to say that I’m disappointed with industry’s continual hypocrisy is a gross understatement.

It’s one thing when you can say that you’re working toward implementation of compliance practices. It’s another when you take one step forward and 3 steps back as an industry in something as “common sense” as “don’t mislead the public” (in every which way that can be done via old media/new media).

For so many years whether as employee or consultant, I have heard company management say “Patients are our #1 concern! People are our greatest asset! We want to do the right thing!” in public forums and company meetings. Then I look at the actions that are motivated by incentives and hidden rules at companies.

I’m not surprised why the government keeps ramping up its prosecution arm. I get that pharma changes are slow, but this looks almost as if pharma wants to test how slow it can change.

I’m not surprised the FDA has to “slow down to keep up”.

I have read some of the recent untitled warning letters sent to pharmacos, and the violative actions from pharmacos. HAVE YOU READ THESE? Look at the list growing from year to year. And how the SAME CITATIONS KEEP COMING UP, AGAIN AND AGAIN.

If I had to cull through the sheer amount of garbage that pharmacos continue to churn out as sales aid, my resources would come up short as well.

It’s like, pharma companies can’t learn!

It makes me want to say, “come on pharmaco people, you guys come armed with MBAs and doctorate degrees, you have teams of lawyers…. SERIOUSLY? THIS TYPE OF VIOLATION – STILL?”

Or more accurately, maybe they just don’t want to learn.

Maybe it’s still a game to see how much money you can make when you push the envelope and offset the profits with FDA imposed penalties and fines.

Even when you slapped with a huge lawsuit costing you hundreds of millions of dollars, well you can act like this is the stock market and say if you earned more revenue than lose it as a liability of “market fluctuation or market conditions” you’ll still come out on top.

Meanwhile, patients lose, healthcare loses, and pharma employees who actually want to do the right thing when earning their keep lose.

OIG’s Top 10 Most Wanted Fugitives

John Walsh probably isn’t going to be featuring these on his “Most Wanted” show, but these criminals are on OIG’s Most Wanted for defrauding the government (and tax payers like you and me) out of millions of dollars by submitting false claims for services or goods (motorized wheelchairs seem to be a popular vehicle).

These people look like very unhappy people, maybe all that stealing and defrauding make one a sour puss in life. Not to mention in prison.

Read more from the Washington Post: Health care fraud: Not a faceless crime any longer.

You Can Fall Victim to Healthcare Fraud!

Think “Healthcare Fraud” happens only with big drug companies with shady sales and marketing practices? Think again!

The next big wave of healthcare fraud is being perpetuated to average people – it’s called Medical Identity Theft.

That’s right… healthcare and insurance benefits are as valuable as cash – in some cases even more valuable than the face value of cash. That’s why ID thieves are targeting people’s healthcare benefits.

These thieves are the scum of the scum because they are literally stripping off people’s ability to save their own lives by messing with their healthcare insurance: imagine you or someone you love suddenly discover you have a catastrophic illness requiring tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of medical treatment. You have coverage except – it was all drained by a medical identity thief. I put these low-lives on par with scum who rip off senior citizens’ life savings.

Take a moment and visit the Federal Trade Commissions’ website to learn more about Medical Identity Theft and how to protect yourself and your family.

Teva Canadian MS Community: No Win for the Company

Teva is closing its community forum from its Canadian multiple sclerosis education website because of Canadian healthcare regulations around dissemination of information relating to prescription drugs.

You’ll read the explanation if you visit the Teva MS website, but keep reading for the crux of the situation:

I have to agree with Teva’s decision because it becomes a no-win for Teva. If Teva were to hire someone to conform to regulations and actively monitor the site, the patients could claim that Teva would allow only favorable comments when it may in …fact be a perception issue. Teva could be allowing only approved/indicated usage discussions posted, rather than removing unfavorable comments to Teva.

On the other hand, Teva stands to be liable for any damages claimed by patients who said they tried something because of what they had in a Teva-hosted discussion forum even if it was not sanctioned by Teva and even if Teva could have disclaimers abound. If I were a company I would not allow a truly “free” discussion forum, other than one that deals specifically with the approved indication of its drug, and even then would question the utility of this over an actual conversation with a licensed healthcare provider.

I see this as a case of controlling information not for restricting its availability but for the sake of responsibility of how that information is used. Drug information can be used out of context and inadvertently harm patients.

On the other hand, non-profit patient advocacy sites will host these discussion forums, and they appear to legally be able to do so. It would be interesting to see how these associations deal with legal situations that could potentially arise from patients being injured or harmed by information shared on the site that may not be accurate or even safe for others. This is a delicate balance of sharing information to help while keeping that Hippocratic “do not harm” oath in mind. Even if the intention is good, injury can occur because of misuse (and that misuse does not have to be intentional, either, it could be accidental).

But the reality is, drug companies are more likely to get sued than non-profits!

First heard from: Nat Bourre

Which Side Are You Really On, Jane Chin?!

I received what is probably the most passionate email from a reader of this blog that I’ve ever gotten since creating NakedMedicine.com in 2006. The email concludes with this:

I can’t figure out what your agenda is Ms Chin. Are siding with the poor hard working physicians who are fighting a losing battle with their idiot patient’s lifestyles? Are you siding with the tirelessly industrious pharmaceutical scientists who are selflessly dedicating their efforts to cure our ills? Are you siding with the poor neglected suffering individuals who are bravely pushing onward in their lives, struggling with disease, possible disease, possible pandemics, or just plain plainness requiring cosmetic medicine? Doctors, business, persons, for whom are you advocating?

I was shocked by the email, because this reader “hit the nail on the head”! He can’t figure out what my agenda is, because my agenda is in NONE of those sides he described. In other words, if I were guilty of picking “a side”, it wasn’t part of the “usual suspects”.

Here’s my very long response to my reader, to whom I’m grateful, because he took the time and effort to share with me this question that obviously is frustrating him.

******

You wrote what you felt, and I don’t fault you for that. I can sense a real feeling of frustration from you, and I don’t blame you for feeling frustrated about the healthcare system that seems to be broken in many ways.

I want to address specific points you brought up – first one being ‘cures’. I genuinely don’t think that the drug industry is prevented from, or are resistant to, discovering cures for diseases. It’s not about ‘cure’ versus ‘not the cure’ that is the problem. It is often the economy of scale that is the problem, and a very understandable one when you consider that the drug industry is – and has to run like a business – in order to remain in business. I have no doubt that the drug industry would love to find a cure – because they can charge for the price of a ‘cure’ and be justified in charging such a price.

The problem on the one hand is that many times we simply cannot find ONE underlying factor of a disease, especially the chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease (in fact, many diabetics die of a heart attack and don’t live long enough to die of diabetes complications, especially those consuming a western diet). It is not like a bacterial infection where we can pinpoint ONE origin of the disease and target that specifically, the way we can target an infecting bacteria with an antibiotic and ‘cure’ the patient.

The other problem is about the number of people with a certain disease. For example, there may be fewer companies willing to research rare diseases that may be ‘repaired’ let alone ‘cured’, simply because the companies need to get the money somehow to do all the experiments and clinical trials necessary to jump through regulatory hurdles to even get the drug approved. When i was a graduate student, doing what are pretty simple experiments (and not even in people – i worked off the petri dishes), i was often using reagents that cost my employer thousands of dollars to purchase from reagent companies. Each of my experiments has to cost at least a thousand bucks, and many of my experiments failed and produced no result.

These prices are nothing compared to the amount of money it costs to run a clinical trial at the scale required by the FDA. Now the drug companies have to pay for the drugs, the cost of mountains of paperwork needed to get the clinical trials started, the doctors who do the clinical trials (and some doctors get really snobby and brag to each other about how much $ they can muscle out of drug companies “per patient” to enroll in the drug companies’ trials), not to mention the “overhead” that the academic institutions charge the drug companies because their doctors work there (and these overhead costs can mean more than 50% of the total study budget).

And then most of the drugs end up not passing the FDA’s requirements and fail to get approved. So if you’re running a company, you will tend to want to go into areas where you will likely have more customers – heart disease for example – just so you stand a better chance of keeping your company operating should it succeed in getting a drug treating that disease approved. This is also why the government has to create incentives for companies that are willing to go into rare or “orphan” diseases – for example, Gaucher’s disease is a rare lysosomal storage disease affecting maybe 1 in 40,000 people. A drug company that competes in this market will be happy selling 1 prescription every 3 months.

I honestly do not view drug companies as entities that profit from the suffering of others, because of the logic of this assumption: If drug companies are creating diseases in people in order to make drugs for the very diseases they created, then that to me qualifies for the statement. However, drug companies happen to offer the tools to treat the disease, not unlike device companies making scalpels and surgical tools to allow doctors to cut us open should our illnesses demand it. It seems illogical to me to accuse device companies for profiting from people having tumors that require scalpels to operate and excise the tumors – unless we’re also implying that the scalpel companies are putting tumors in people that only their brand of scalpel can remove.

Additionally, I have observed that for the most part, people in our society today tend to prefer that we “have a pill to treat XYZ”, so that they do not have to do the hard work required to get their own health back on track. And then you add to the fire media agencies that charge pharma companies millions of dollars to come up with brainless gimmicky advertisements, and it is no wonder why many people feel like the drug companies are “profiteers of suffering.” Some years ago, there was a government funded study that shows that rigorous diet and exercise will help reduce diabetes risk at a very real level – in fact – the study patients who had diet and exercise regimen did as well in reducing their diabetes symptoms as study patients who took an anti-diabetic drug.

But why hasn’t the government or the doctors (not the drug companies – their responsibility is in making drugs) done anything about this amazing result? Because the of costs involved to the clinics in order to make “diet and exercise” possible in patients at a therapeutic level. Clinics would need to hire case workers and nurses whose job is to counsel and support and follow each and every single patient who opts for this “natural and effective” treatment. OK then, how about asking patients themselves to do this? Seriously, if you are a patient at risk for diabetes (i.e. risk factors are there, but patient is still “pre-diabetic” and not yet requiring drugs to control their blood sugars), you have everything you need at your disposal to go for the natural and effective (and less expensive than prescription drugs) cure! why aren’t patients doing this? because willpower and discipline are key – and you’re going to need both for a lifetime to prolong the onset of disease.

I can share this true experience – my husband had prediabetic blood work results some years ago when I urged him to see an endocrinologist, because his side of the family also suffers from diabetes. the endocrinologist told him that because he was so young (not yet 40 at the time), she preferred that he try the old fashioned diet and exercise, and see if he could get the risk factors down, before she put him on a drug. He happens to have a level of willpower and discipline that even I don’t have – and he altered his lifestyle dramatically – and it was enormously difficult. 6 weeks later he went back and the endocrinologist was so impressed with his results that she told him that most of his blood work results were approaching normal numbers. But she also told us that not every patient she sees can make this happen – and often she is forced to give the patient drugs to make sure that the patient doesn’t end up with uncontrolled diabetes symptoms (resulting in all sorts of nasty things including death).

I see drugs as exactly what you said you wished to see – repairs and cures. However, the reality is, few are truly cures because of the complexities of most diseases, and repairs don’t always “fix” things without creating new problems (called side effects) EXACTLY because of the complexities of most diseases.

The doctors’ hands are tied not by pharma companies, but by insurance companies as well as their own malpractice lawsuit concerns. Your average primary care doctor has to track how many patients he sees everyday because he needs to make sure he breaks even. That’s not the drug companies doing, but the insurance companies that capitate how much doctors are paid for doing what. So you also have a system that don’t reward doctors for spending more time with patients – in fact – you’re making it very bad business for the doctor to spend too much time because then he’ll lose money that day – and this does not do well to cultivate trust with patients who then need to heed the doctors’ advice about doing the hard things they need to do to steer their health status back on track.

I hope my email begins to help you understand where I am coming from – perhaps I can’t take any sides because I don’t think there are any sides that I can reasonably take without acknowledging that there are other entities that also need to be held accountable. the healthcare ‘system” is truly a “system” and a staggering, complex one at that. the best I can do is to help the consumers – people like you and me – to think for ourselves about what is being “sold” to us whether it’s from the drug companies, insurance companies, the government, the doctors, even patient groups. If I am guilty of siding with anything, it will be on the side of “critical thinking” about the system of healthcare with all of its players.

Best wishes,
Jane Chin

Provenge and FDA’s Etiology For Not Approving

By Dan Abshear

Terminal patients are those who are not expected to live due to usually illness such as advanced prostate cancer (cT3). If the patient has 6 months or less to live, those patients are considered terminally ill. Regardless, if a patient is terminal, they are without a cure or tolerable treatment for their illness. Since such patients will likely die in a short period of time, treatment options, even if unproven, are often desired by such patients. This is understandable, because at such a severe stage of illness, such as prostate cancer, possible extension of their lives with comfort is worth it to them, regardless of lack of evidence of proof of whatever treatment that may be advantageous to them regarding these issues. The FDA, however, claims authority on the treatment options of such patients, although that administration has proven itself over the years to be rather inadequate with its frequent drug recalls and black box warnings, and they do these things only under pressure from the public, usually.

Prostate cancer is a rather frequent occurrence- with between 10 to 20 percent of men predicted to acquire the disease during their lifespan, resulting in about 30,000 deaths a year from this disease of the one million men who have prostate cancer in the United States. Furthermore, there are different stages of prostate cancer, and the more severe the prostate cancer cases are which is determined by such methods as bone scans and Gleason’s scores, which is a score that assesses prostate tissue after it is biopsied and if it is determined that the stage of cancer is severe by this and to estimate proper treatment options if proven to be malignant. Typically, the initial suspicion of prostate cancer is determined by the results of what is called a PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) blood test, as PSA is a protein produced by prostate cancer cells. If the PSA blood test is above normal limits, a prostate biopsy is performed to determine and confirm not only the presence of cancer, but also the severity of the disease on such a patient.

Yet fortunately, and as you will read, innovation still exists in medicine. A few years ago, a small Biotechnology company called Dendreon was working on a conceptually new treatment for the worst prostate cancer patients, and this treatment therapy created by Dendreon was named Provenge. Provenge is the first immunotherapy biologic treatment for the progressed prostate cancer patients, and has proven to be a very novel and innovative treatment option for advanced prostate cancer patients who are terminally ill. Usually, these patients are unresponsive to usual treatment methods for prostate cancer, and are left with chemotherapy as their only treatment option at such a traumatic stage of prostate cancer. Understandably, most patients at this stage refuse treatment entirely, largely due to the brutal side effects of such chemotherapy treatments as Taxotere (Sanofi Aventis, docetaxel). The immunotherapy method developed by Dendreon required the removal of white blood cells of the diseased patient and, after altered, are re-injected into this patient now designed to attack what is called PAP, which is on prostate cancer cells only. This treatment required only three such injections in a period of six weeks. This resulted in life extension twice that of chemotherapy treated prostate cancer patients of this severity, and without the concerning side effects of chemotherapy. The medical community and survivors of prostate cancer were elated and waited with great anticipation for access to this treatment method.

Fortunately, as the years passed, Provenge, by 2007, had convinced others of its safety and efficacy in its benefit for severe prostate cancer patients. This caused great joy to such patients and their families. Perhaps greater elation was experienced by the caregivers and specialists of such a disease, such as urologists and oncologists who treat such patients. While Provenge was on fast track status at this time at the FDA, the FDA panel thankfully recommended with clarity the approval of Provenge based on its proven and substantial efficacy and safety demonstrated in its performance in past trials. The FDA announced this to the public in the early Spring of 2007, I believe.

Now for the bad news: With great shock and surprise, the FDA agency rejected the approval of this great treatment for very sick patients due to, they said, ‘lack of data’ in May of 2007. This contradicts their favorable opinion of Provenge weeks before delivering this terrible news. Especially when one considers the FDA Commissioner is a prostate cancer survival himself!

Soon after this judgment was passed by the FDA, conflicts of interest were discovered by others. For example, a member of the FDA agency who was evaluating Provenge, Dr. Scher, was found to have a financial commitment to a future competitor of Provenge that was being produced by a company called Novacea, and this company had signed a co-promotion agreement with Schering with this similar prostate cancer drug being developed by this company. Dr. Scher never disclosed this conflict during the approval process of Provenge. As it turns out, this anticipated prostate cancer drug made by Novacea was discovered to have serious flaws, and Schering pulled out of the agreement with Novacea. In addition to this incident and before May of 2007, baseless letters were anonymously delivered to the FDA stating negative qualities about Provenge that were without merit and speculative claims about the treatment. Yet overall, the disapproval by the FDA of Provenge angered many, and a newly formed advocacy group called Care to Live filed a lawsuit against the FDA for their clear lack of protocol or knowledge about such complex treatment agents as Provenge at the end of last year.

Terminal patients, I surmise, desire comfort during their progressive disease that has placed them in the last chapter of their lives, and certainly should have a right to choose any treatment that possibly could benefit them. At this stage of such a patient, one could argue, safety of any treatment option is not of concern to these patients, because they are going to die anyway. Yet the FDA, with reckless disregard and overt harshness for these very ill patients, ultimately harmed others more by not approving Provenge with deliberate intent.

The FDA does in fact presently have the ability to grant what is called conditional approval for such treatment methods as Provenge, and why they have not expanded this approval process to all terminally ill patients remains completely unknown. What is known is that they are harming those they pledged to protect so long ago by depriving such patients in need of treatment, as no other options are viable presently that are as safe and effective with great tolerability associated with Provenge. So now the FDA appears to be a bought, corrupt, and incompetent administration without loyalty and dedication to the public and its health. This needs to be corrected in any way possible for the lives of others. A terminally ill patient has a personal right to obtain and access such treatments upon their own volition as well as the discretion of their doctor, just as a terminally ill patient is granted an individual right to die, if they choose to do so. It is an individual decision in such cases that should be void of interference from others.

“Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” — Aldous Huxley

Bullied by Pharma Co? Fax Senator Grassley

Doctors can now fax Senator Chuck Grassley at 202-228-2131 to report on drug companies that the doctors perceive to “push too far” and are being “bullied” by drug companies. Doctors can remain anonymous and send information by mail or fax. This effort came at the heels of the Avandia investigation earlier this year, where manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline was accused of pressuring Avandia critic John Buse to change his story about Avandia risks. The company said it wanted Buse to correct factual errors Buse made about the drug, while Buse said the company used intimidation tactics.

I wonder if Grassley knows what floodgate he’s opening up by creating a service that allows anonymous tips on what is very much a subjective behavior (i.e. what one perceives to be intimidation or bullying or “hardball tactics”), and whether the senator is actually equipped to conduct investigations into every complaint filed. Source: WSJ Blog.

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