Naked Medicine

Let's Face It: Medicine is Business

Category: Smoking

Pharma Industry’s Job is NOT Disease Prevention. THAT’S YOUR JOB.

I’ve heard the argument, so have you.

“Those evil pharma companies aren’t interested in prevention! They want people to get sick and stay sick because that’s how they make their money! On the drugs!”

Recently I had railed against the pharma companies that are capitalizing on increasing trends of people using certain prescription drugs as “lifestyle drugs” – not to mention appearing on the Wall Street Journal this past Friday to rail against pharma companies that abuse the role of medical science liaisons, so I have my own pet peeves and criticisms with pharma. What irks me is when a criticism about any industry is not based on a fundamental flaw in that industry, but is simply born of politicking sensationalizing this-is-how-I-get-more-readers/viewers tactic.

Most of these people have taken a basic science class at some point in their lives and learned about a phenomenon called “entropy”. How things in a system tend to go toward disorder, and to halt this “natural” occurrence from occurring, you have to add in a great deal of energy, and even that won’t ultimately stop the inevitable.

Kind of like the idea of life and death, which is relevant to the assessment of this dimension of our hostility towards the pharmaceutical industry.

Obviously, pharma companies want you to stay alive, preferably as long as possible. This is not so they can capitalize on you dying (a dead person is no longer a customer)! The pharmaceutical industry is a business that capitalizes on your DESIRE to PROLONG YOUR LIFE AND MINIMIZE PHYSICAL PAIN AND SUFFERING. If you aren’t interested in prolonging life and minimizing physical pain and suffering, the pharma industry ain’t gonna benefit from YOU since you’re not a customer to begin with!

Let’s say you are sick from complications of heart disease.

Pharma companies that are in the heart disease business is not responsible for PREVENTING YOU from getting heart disease. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE for making sure you do what you’re supposed to do to reduce your risk of getting heart disease, unless somehow you have signed the claim to your physical existence over to another person who is legally responsible for your physical survival and health.

Your family doctor may have a responsibility to educate you on mitigating the risks of getting heart disease, so those who want to rant about prevention may want to point their antennae to the medical profession, but ultimately YOU are STILL RESPONSIBLE for the behaviors and actions YOU TAKE that lead to the result of heart disease or no-heart disease. Your doctors can be the best doctors they can be and even give you a diet and exercise regimen that will lower your cholesterol, reduce your blood pressure, and take down your diabetes risk factors a few notches – but if you DON’T DO WHAT YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO, then you will end up with the health consequences. Actually, this is EXACTLY what happens in many obesity and heart disease cases today. Doctors themselves will admit that many of their patients won’t heed their advice, and most will lack the discipline required to stick with a rigorous healthy lifestyle to make a lifesaving change.

Are we saying that it’s the pharma industry’s job to PREVENT us from assuming behaviors that will put our health at risk? If there’s a pill for stopping us from risky behaviors, and pharma makes it commercially available, then we’ll simply turn around and say “now pharma wants to control our thoughts and actions!” (I think we already have those kind of pills, and there are activists and lawyers jumping on that bandwagon.)

Seriously, if you take care of your body, do everything healthy like you’re inundated by all media outlets to do (don’t drink, don’t smoke, don’t go out in the sun without wearing sunscreen, eat more fruits and vegetables, exercise at least 30 minutes a day, etc…), then you’re probably not going to need all those pharmaceuticals until the inevitable process of aging occurs, where your cells can’t care less what you’ve done because they’re all getting old and breaking down as a natural part of the decline of “life” in your physical human existence.

Why Smokers Do and Don’t Quit Smoking

My father-in-law is in his 70s and still smokes every day. He’s tried to quit before, but in the recent years has decided that he was old enough to live his life however he wanted, and that included smoking. Nevermind the fact that he has had a quadruple bypass operation for his clogged arteries (and other coronary operations), is on polypharmacy, leads a sedentary lifestyle, and has been nagged by his doctors and us about quitting smoking for years.

I know that many doctors – especially internists and general practitioners/family doctors – often encourage their smoking patients to quit smoking, citing the harms of smoking and the benefits of not smoking relative to the patient’s capacity to heal. Even those of us who do not practice medicine but work in the healthcare field know that smoking wreaks havoc on a variety of bodily functions right down to the molecular level.

Earlier this year, three Greek researchers published a study on why smokers quit or don’t quit smoking in Harm Reduction Journal (source: Harm Reduction Journal, March 29, 2006, 3:13 doi:10.1186/1477-7517-3-13). What they found may give some insight not just to medical doctors with an interest to helping their patients quit smoking, but for those of us with a personal interest to help either our loved ones or ourselves to quit smoking.

A popular assumption many doctors have about smokers quitting smoking is to introduce cognitive dissonance – an emotional state of mind where two beliefs are in conflict with each other. A person experiencing cognitive dissonance will move to resolve that conflict of belief. If a smoker believes that smoking is harmful to one’s health yet continues to smoke, the smoker experiences this contradiction and would move to resolve that contradiction. One would assume that the smoker would then stop smoking – right?

I doubt that smokers would deny the harmful effects of smoking. We can see from what’s happening in society that this is not the case – people still smoke even when they’ve been exposed to anti-smoking campaigns, nagging from friends and loved ones (I admit, I am one of those annoying people who remind their friends that smoking is bad for them), and shock-and-awe pictures of lungs blackened by chronic smoking.

(more…)

Target for Addictions Identified Deep in the Brain

“Man becomes cigarette smoker. Man suffers from stroke. Man completely loses urge to smoke.”

This sums up the neon lights that have been blinking nonstop in the media around the scientific paper, “Damage to the Insula Disrupts Addiction to Cigarette Smoking” that was published in the January 26, 2007 issue of Science magazine (pages 531-534). The magazine also ran a commentary, “Brain Damage Sheds Light on Urge to Smoke” on the paper.

The key? A brain region called the insular cortext, or insula, deep within the cerebral cortex. This region has been implicated in other addictions, including cocaine addiction. Signals that trigger this region has been linked to the stimulation of addictive desires. This means insula is a potential therapeutic target – in other words – drugs or treatments that affect insula’s ability to stimulate addictive desires become a therapy for addiction. (more…)

Naked Medicine © 2016 Frontier Theme