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CME and Pharma: Doctors Want Support That They Can’t Trust

“Doctors want CMEs paid for them but can’t trust the people they want to help pay for their continuing medical education.” That’s how I sum up the below survey published by Archives of Internal Medicine.

Look at what the conclusion said: “Although the medical professionals responding to this survey were concerned about bias introduced from commercial funding of CME, many were not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources.”

If doctors are so concerned about ethics and bias, then they need to put up the money and pay for their own continuing education to stay current in their fields so that they can do their jobs. But based on “reality”, doctors are more concerned about their bottom-line and the survey suggests that their bottom-line trumps whatever concerns about bias they may have.

Clinician Attitudes About Commercial Support of Continuing Medical Education

Results of a Detailed Survey

Jeffrey A. Tabas, MD; Christy Boscardin, PhD; Donna M. Jacobsen, BS; Michael A. Steinman, MD; Paul A. Volberding, MD; Robert B. Baron, MD, MS

Arch Intern Med. 2011;171(9):840-846. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2011.179

Background Pharmaceutical and medical device company funding supports up to 60% of accredited continuing medical education (CME) costs in the United States. Some have proposed measures to limit the size, scope, and potential influence of commercial support for CME activities. We sought to determine whether participants at CME activities perceive that commercial support introduces bias, whether this is affected by the amount or type of support, and whether they would be willing to accept higher fees or fewer amenities to decrease the need for such funding.

Methods We delivered a structured questionnaire to 1347 participants at a series of 5 live CME activities about the impact of commercial support on bias and their willingness to pay additional amounts to eliminate the need for commercial support.

Results Of the 770 respondents (a 57% response rate), most (88%) believed that commercial support introduces bias, with greater amounts of support introducing greater risk of bias. Only 15%, however, supported elimination of commercial support from CME activities, and less than half (42%) were willing to pay increased registration fees to decrease or eliminate commercial support. Participants who perceived bias from commercial support more frequently agreed to increase registration fees to decrease such support (2- to 3-fold odds ratio). Participants greatly underestimated the costs of ancillary activities, such as food, as well as the degree of support actually provided by commercial funding.

Conclusion Although the medical professionals responding to this survey were concerned about bias introduced from commercial funding of CME, many were not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources.

Updated: June 30, 2013 — 8:04 am

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