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Why I Chose NOT to be a Doctor

I was once a premed.

I chose not to become a doctor because I wasn’t truly interested in the profession, it was something I felt I “had” to do or “should” do because I happened to major in biology. And being a first generation Asian-American there was also pressure from being a “Tiger Cub”: we have limited career options: doctor, lawyer, engineer. I suck in math and was good in biology. Guess which option I had?

In my undergrad classes I was among other premeds; many of them went in for the Money, the Prestige, for their Parents. But they will all talk about how much they love helping people/patients on their applications.

I did consider taking the MCAT and even paid for one of those “prep courses”, in case I changed my mind. But I knew my grades weren’t good enough, I didn’t have “connections”, and I wasn’t going to throw good money after a bad risk, especially when that money was already borrowed money via student loans. I went to grad school instead.

Then I started working in the healthcare industry, first working for the pharma industry. Maybe the nature of my work in pharma predisposed me to witness the doctor-industry relationship in a way that brought out some of the unsavory traits of the medical profession.

I saw some of these doctors up close – their lives (and lack thereof), their values (and lack thereof), their character (and lack thereof), bedside manners (and lack thereof).

We are constantly reading about how “evil” the Pharmaceutical Industry is and how they corrupt doctors and so forth – that gets a lot of coverage in the presses. Well, I’ve seen it from the other side: there are doctors who have become savvier businessmen than they are savvy clinicians and they are perfectly capable of manipulating drug companies to fulfill their personal interests. I’ve had doctors asking me for favors that I knew had nothing to do with improving patient care. I’m not embarrassed to admit that my first year of working in industry had almost completely destroyed the trust I used to have in doctors.

I saw the state of Managed Care and the “healthcare business” that has made doctors more busy with administrative work than taking care of patients. A HMO doctor once explained to me that he goes through each day making sure he breaks even by seeing 50 patients. He knows how much $ he gets paid per patient from the HMO. So he has to see a certain # of patients to stay in business. Depending on the patient’s condition, say the patient has a cold, he’d spend a few seconds with the person, and knowing that the patient would expect “something” for the visit, the doctor would write a prescription for an antibiotic just to get that patient out of the office, so he could see the next patient.

The medical profession was not something I’d ever wanted for myself if I did not have a deep-rooted passion and conviction about going into the profession. In fact, the medical profession is one that I would not encourage my child to go into, unless again, he expresses a serious conviction about becoming a physician. I actually have to be careful about my own prejudices – that I do not vehemently discourage my child from considering this profession. That would be as bad as the Tiger Mothers who force their children into the medical profession.

I know this puts me in the “outlier” group of Asian mothers. But then again I’ve always been an outlier.

Updated: June 30, 2013 — 8:04 am

3 Comments

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  1. Thanks for sharing!

  2. Great article. I recently made a switch to biomedical engineering despite my parents’ wishes that I go to med school..

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